Dale Steyn explains how Tim Southee dismissed Rohit Sharma using “three-quarter seam” on Day 5 of WTC final

The former world number 1 bowler said that to bowl such a delivery, the ball is not exactly held cross seam.

Saurabh Ganguly Author

Updated - 15 July 2021 4:37 pm

The ICC World Test Championship final is at an interesting phase. While India have taken a 57-run lead with their scoreboard reading 89/4 in the second innings, unfortunately they lost the wickets of openers Rohit Sharma and Shubman Gill with the Hitman departing just 15 minutes before the end of play on Day 5. The wicket put the Kiwis on top as Rohit had done the hard work and looked set for a big one when Tim Southee’s masterful three-quarter ball deceived the Indian opener as the Mumbai Indians captain made an error in judgement.

It was a pretty good setup from the Kiwi pacer as he consistently bowled away swingers and brought one back in without any noticeable change in action. Rohit, who perhaps thought the ball would swing away, shouldered his arms to it but it came and trapped him with a LBW. South African veteran Dale Steyn latter offered an explanation of the dismissal.

With three-quarter seam, you can get it to straighten or nibble back in: Steyn

The former world number 1 bowler said that to bowl such a delivery, the ball is not exactly held cross seam which is why it is termed “three-quarter seam.” This position allows the bowler to not only get the ball to straighten but also jag it back in.

"If you hold that three quarter seam, you can get it to straighten or nibble back in and hit the pads, get bowled to left-handers especially from over the wicket,” Steyn said while speaking to ESPNCricinfo.

“The key is to try and get your wrist, fingers to really come just straight down behind it (seam). You don’t want to have any breaking of the wrist. If you have any breaking of the wrist, it (the seam) kind of wobbles too much. You want that wrist right behind the ball. Southee is good at it. You can see his wrist runs nicely behind that seam and when it lands, the ball nips back beautifully,” he added.

Meanwhile, the summit clash of the inaugural World Test Championship heads into a reserve day with Blackcaps looking in control of the proceedings.