“Humara time aaya hai England pe raaj karne ka” – A throwback to Virender Sehwag’s hilarious comment on iconic Natwest win

Sehwag made a vital 45 from 49 in that iconic run-chase, sharing a 106-run opening stand with Sourav Ganguly.

Saurabh Ganguly Author

Updated - 21 July 2021 4:20 pm

It's been 19 years since India beat England in the iconic Natwest Trophy final at Lord's, London in 2002. While India were doing well in that era of cricket, they were just not able to go the distance and often lost in the finals of leading competitions. For a good period of even this marquee game, it looked like Team India were dead and buried. While England had won the toss and opted to bat first, they managed to post a massive 325 runs on the board- a huge score in that era. In response, captain Sourav Ganguly and Virender Sehwag helped India off to a superb start, the duo adding 106 runs in 82 balls to put India on course of a memorable win.

However, soon after Ganguly departed for a fluent 60 from 43 balls, India's batting collapsed. Sehwag, Dinesh Mongia, Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid- all departed in quick succession with the team reeling at 146/5. But young guns Yuvraj Singh and Mohammad Kaif brought India back into the game with a century stand before Kaif finished it for the team which was followed by Ganguly taking his shirt off and waving at the Lord's balcony to celebrate the memorable win.

Was afraid of getting hit by an angry Flintoff, not of losing that final: Sehwag

Talking about the match, former opener Virender Sehwag, who was involved in a century stand with Sourav and made 45 from 49 balls, had revealed how he was whistling his way onto the middle even as Dada looked stressed ahead of the run-chase. "I was afraid of getting hit by an angry Andre Flintoff (Andrew) not of losing the match," he had said on India TV's Aap Ki Adalat. In typical Viru style, he added, "England itne salon se humpe raaj kia hai, ab humara time aya hai unpe raaj karne ka" which loosely translates to, "England ruled us for so many years, now it was our time to rule them (in cricket)."