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If a batsman plays a reverse sweep, he should be given out lbw even if the ball pitches outside leg: R Ashwin

Notably, as per current rules, a batsman is ruled not out even if the ball is expected to hit the stumps as long as the ball pitches outside the leg stump as it's considered a blind spot for a batsman.

Ritesh Pathak Author

Updated - 13 July 2022 1:19 pm

Ashwin

Indian star off-spinner R Ashwin is known for his knowledge of the game of cricket. Ashwin always has a solution for any cricketing problem. The Indian cricketer is also really vocal about the changes required in the existing rulebook of cricket. While Ashwin has put forth many demands, this time he has asked the rule-makers to change the way lbw dismissals are decided.

With cricket evolving like never before and batters trying everything at their disposal to keep bowlers off track, Ashwin has demanded a slight change in lbw dismissal rules. The Indian off-spinner has said that if a batter plays reverse sweep or switch hit and the ball hits his pads, he/she should be given out lbw irrespective of where the ball has pitched.

“Please play your reverse sweeps, but give us (bowlers) lbw!” Ashwin said on his YouTube channel. “How can you say it’s not lbw when you turn (your body and it’s no longer a blind spot). It’s only a blind spot when you are at your normal stance. Once you play the reverse sweep or switch hit, it’s no longer a blind spot. It’s extremely unfair that it’s not ruled lbw,” said Ashwin on his YouTube channel.

The 35-year-old also explained the reason behind his demand. Ashwin said that while bowlers give every possible information before delivering the ball, the batters have the liberty to change things till the last moment. Hence, the authorities must look up to this rule of deciding lbw dismissals to even up the contest.

“As a bowler, I tell the batsman my line of attack (over or around the stumps), and I am giving a clear glimpse of my field too. You front up as a right-handed batsman but switch to a left-hander,” said the off-spinner.

Notably, as per current rules, a batsman is ruled not out even if the ball is expected to hit the stumps as long as the ball pitches outside the leg stump as it’s considered a blind spot for a batsman. For the blind spot argument, Ashwin says that as soon as a batter changes his stance, his blind spot also changes.

“The moment you turn around you are front-on. My question is not whether he can play reverse sweep or not, whether it’s a negative bowling strategy or not (bowling outside leg stump), my point is about lbw. It’s extremely unfair that it’s not ruled lbw,” explained Ashwin.

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